CPFT expert's research in child brain injury rehabilitation featured at international conference

Gillian Shravat from CPFT's Cambridge Centre for Paediatric Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (CCPNR) has had her work profiled at prestigious conference in Rome.

CPFT expert's research in child brain injury rehabilitation featured at international conference
30 October 2017

Gillian Shravat from the Cambridge Centre for Paediatric Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (CCPNR) was invited to present her research from her CLAHRC fellowship at the International Paediatric Brain Injury Conference at the Vatican University in Rome recently. 

Her research on acquired brain injury in children concluded that there is a need for commissioning guidelines and service delivery models to recognise the potential implications of family and pre-injury factors, developmental processes and education provision much earlier in the rehabilitation pathway.

The CCPNR is the first community interdisciplinary neurorehabilitation service for children and their families in the NHS. It has been the inspiration for other NHS services in the UK and internationally.

Gillian qualified as a speech and language therapist in 2006. Since then she has worked with children and adults with both acquired and developmental complex needs. She also completed additional training from NHS England on Change Management in the NHS. She went on to specialise in working with children with acquired brain injury and has worked at the CCPNR since 2012. Gillian led the research, working alongside Adam Wagner and Fergus Gracey from the University of East Anglia and a summary is below. 

Dr Aafke Ninteman, Clinical Psychologist and Clinical Lead for CCPNR, said: "We were proud to see Gillian up there on the stage with other internationally renowned speakers. Her pioneering research helps us to further understand the complex needs of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) and the kind of rehabilitation that will help clinicians to improve service needs of children and young people with brain injuries."

Painting A Picture of Possible Clinical Pathways to Address the Diversity of Needs Following Acquired Brain Injury in Children

Introduction: Children with Acquired Brain Injury (cABI) have poorer long term outcomes than their peers, in terms of emotions, behaviour, quality of life, education, cognition and social interactions. Multiple variables can impact engagement with rehabilitation and outcomes, creating challenges for service delivery,
treatment planning and commissioning.

Objective: Identify and characterise different subgroups of service user based on a range of clinical and demographic factors collected prior to and during rehabilitation. Identify predictors of service use.

Method: Participants were 72 consecutive referrals to a child ABI community neuropsychological rehabilitation service (mean age 12; 44 % Female; 57 %TBI). Data was analysed with Hierarchical Cluster Analysis to group participants using 6 clinically meaningful initial assessment variables. Clusters were subject to post hoc analysis comparing 4 demographic and diagnostic variables. Regression analysis planned to explore predictors of intervention received by each cluster.

Results: Three clusters of service user were identified which differed significantly in terms of psychiatric difficulties; executive dysfunction; age at injury; age at referral; number of current family life stressors and school attendance.

Conclusion: Data collected at referral can be used to cluster service users into three statistically significant and clinically meaningful groups, characterised by pre and post injury mental health issues, executive functioning and poorer educational and social outcomes. Commissioning guidelines and service delivery models need to recognise the potential implications of family and pre-injury factors, developmental processes and education provision much earlier in the rehabilitation pathway. Targeted community provision following cABI could prevent or limit development of costly and socially significant difficulties requiring multi-agency input, Safeguarding, Youth Offending and in-patient cABI units.

 

ENDS

Contact details
For more information please contact:
Adrian Ient
Communications Manager
E adrian.ient@cpft.nhs.uk 
T 01223 219470

Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust
Elizabeth House, Fulbourn Hospital
Cambridge, CB21 5EF

T 01223 219400 (open 8:30am to 5pm)
F 01480 398501

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